Wisconsin Governor Evers touts funding plan on Superior school visit

Wisconsin Governor Tony Evers visited Northern Lights Elementary School in Superior Tuesday to speak with students and tout his plan to increase funding for pub
Published: Sep. 8, 2022 at 4:09 PM CDT
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DULUTH, MN. (KBJR) - Wisconsin Governor Tony Evers visited Northern Lights Elementary School in Superior Tuesday to speak with students and tout his plan to increase funding for public schools in Wisconsin.

Evers, a democrat running for re-election, announced his plan earlier in the week to give $2 billion to K-12 public schools.

“The state has an obligation around helping schools to fund their operations,” Evers said.

The multi-billion dollar investment would be taken from a projected $5 billion state surplus. In order for the plan to be enacted, Republicans, who currently control the state legislature, would have to vote in favor of the budget.

“I think it’s a great opportunity to use that budget surplus that we have and so we’re gonna be fighting for that,” Evers said.

The plan would increase revenue limits for schools to $350 next year and $650 for the 2023-2024 school year. A revenue limit caps the amount a school can raise from state aid and property taxes combined.

According to Evers, it would also invest in school without raising property taxes.

“We can also keep property taxes low and even to what it is now,” Evers said.

Evers’ plan would put funding for more per student spending, mental health services for school districts and investing in literacy learning for kids.

While on his visit, Evers read books to kids and passed out trays of food during lunch time. He also had the chance to talk with the Superior students about their favorite parts of school.

“It keeps me sharp, for sure,” he said, “that really keeps me grounded.”

Republican Gubernatorial candidate Tim Michels pointed toward his education plan on his website in response to Evers’ visit.

The plan includes investing in more vocational programs as well as adopting legislation that would improve reading proficiency across the state.

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